Exhibition: Wendy Ramshaw – Modern Jewellery

July 23, 2018

We are delighted to announce that Goldsmiths’ Fair will be partnering with The Scottish Gallery for an exhibition of work by the doyenne of contemporary British Jewellery.

In addition to showcasing the UK’s best fine jewellery and contemporary silver, this year Goldsmiths’ Fair will partner with The Scottish Gallery to mount a special exhibition featuring the pioneering jewellery of Wendy Ramshaw, CBE, RDI.  Acclaimed globally as one of the key figures in the British contemporary jewellery movement from 1960 onwards, Ramshaw’s work is instantly recognisable for its signature geometry and skilfully executed design.

Ramshaw employs a unique approach by making jewellery in parts or sections, so that the owner can choose how to wear each element, creating an individual arrangement of pieces worn in any order.  Her ‘stacking rings’ displayed on upright posts have been both influential among fellow jewellers and admired by collectors.

The Scottish Gallery holds the largest collection of available works by Wendy Ramshaw from key periods in her career including; Picasso’s Ladies, Room of Dreams and a Journey Through Glass. This exhibition provides a glimpse into Ramshaw’s spectacular career and will include her signature ‘ringsets’. The Scottish Gallery will be producing a new publication to accompany the exhibition.

Ramshaw’s pioneering ring sets are represented in over 70 public collections worldwide including: the V & A Museum, London; National Museums Scotland, Edinburgh; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, USA; National Gallery of Western Australia, Canberra; British Museum, London; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; and The National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto.

 

Ramshaw was born in Sunderland in 1939.  She studied fabric design at Newcastle-upon-Tyne College of Art and Industrial Design and later went on to study at London’s Central School of Art and Design in 1969.  She was first noticed when selling her paper jewellery at Mary Quant’s Mayfair store. Customers had to cut out the jewellery and assemble it from paper patterns. Her signature pieces were developed around 1965 and consist of gold rings stored upright on a post – a fun and novel way to store jewellery which ultimately won her the Design Council Award for Innovation in 1972.

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